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Expanding Our Thinking — Noncash Gifts are Key to Fundraising Growth

As fundraisers, we are trained to focus on cash gifts. After all, they are the easiest type of gift to make, right? I recently heard a presentation providing some very good evidence that from our donors’ perspective, this might not be the case at all. Professor Russell James III, the Director of Graduate Studies in Charitable Financial Planning at Texas Tech University, analyzed over a million tax returns of both individuals and nonprofit organizations in an effort to see why some organizations report what seems like astronomical growth in their fundraising programs, while others report basically flat fundraising attainment over years. The results were eye-opening: nonprofit organizations that accepted noncash gifts, including appreciated securities, grew their fundraising 6 times faster than organizations that only accepted gifts of cash. Importantly, this increase was seen in organizations at every level of fundraising. Professor James research makes it clear that noncash gifts are key to growth in any fundraising program.

If we take a look at the asset portfolios of our wealthy donors, we begin to see why cash gifts may not be the easiest types of gifts for these individuals to make. As net worth increases, the percentage of that net worth held in cash decreases, because more and more of the high net worth donor’s portfolio will be held in appreciated securities and often real estate. In general, cash only comprises 6-8% of the value of assets held by individuals, yet 90% of charitable gifts are made with cash. There’s our opportunity as savvy fundraisers.

Certainly there are challenges in accepting noncash gifts, especially gifts of property other than appreciated marketable securities. Your department, or your outside advisors, needs to understand and be ready to deal with various challenges, including:

  • tax and legal issues
  • environmental concerns for gifts of real estate (take note that environmental problems are extremely rare, especially those that aren’t fairly obvious during the course of a simple initial audit)
  • management of noncash assets until your organization can resell them (this tends to be a concern more about staff work load than any significant financial risk)
  • cumbersome internal gift acceptance processes (if you’re serious about accepting noncash gifts, you’re not going to be able to move fast enough to accept your donor’s offer if you have a board level gift acceptance committee in the way)
  • inaccurate perceptions of risk vs. reward (remember, even if you have to sell an asset at below market value, your organization is still receiving a financial benefit because your cash investment in the asset is likely extremely low)

Here are some practical tips for mitigating risk:

  • Don’t accept gifts of animals or livestock of any kind
  • Don’t accept gifts of anything involved in transportation (cars, boats, motorcycles, snowmobiles, etc.)
  • Don’t accept gifts of timeshares or cemetery plots
  • Have some outside experts readily available to help you with the tax and legal concerns, and to help manage property/assets until sale if your staff is too busy to take this task on

I encourage you to read Professor James research for more information on the amazing opportunities presented by the ability to accept noncash gifts for your organization.

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A Guide to Standing Committees for Nonprofits — The Development Committee

I may be biased, since I’ve been both a professional and volunteer fundraiser at various points in my career, but I think the Development or Fundraising Committee is, next to the Governance Committee, the most important standing committee of a nonprofit board. After all, if nobody is raising money, none of the other committees have anything to do! But while this committee is vitally important to the financial sustainability of your organization, it can also be the most challenging committee to manage and implement.

In developing a strategy to mobilize an effective Development Committee, I suggest we start with two premises or principals. The first premise is that fundraising is the responsibility of the whole board; every member, without exception, should play some role in raising funds for your organization. The second premise is that the primary responsibility of the Development Committee is to create and foster a culture within your organization that allows your full board to feel empowered, confident, and (dare I say) comfortable with their role in the fundraising process.

To me, this means the Development Committee is not created to be the small group of board members who do all of the asking during your various campaigns and initiatives. At the end of the day, they may be those people, but that shouldn’t be the primary reason people are asked to sit on the Development Committee. A structure like this will likely give the impression that the rest of the board isn’t needed in the fundraising process. Rather, consider these primary areas for your Development Committee to assist staff:

  • Create a development plan that is reflective of the goals and needs of your the organization
  • Communicate and cultivate buy in for the organization’s case for support among the full board
  • Create tools and resources for the board to use in their own individual fundraising efforts
  • Allow each board member to identify the specific tasks and roles they will play in the fundraising process
  • Create a sense of accountability for achieving those tasks and roles

Consider this sample description of the Development Committee:

Development Committee

The Development Committee shall: (a) review, approve, and support goals and strategies for, and oversee the progress of, the Corporation’s fundraising initiatives, including the Annual Fund, major and planned gifts, capital, endowment, and comprehensive campaigns, and events, in consultation with the Finance Committee; (b) support and assist the Development Office in its efforts to engage members, donors and supporters in the activities of the Corporation, and to cultivate, solicit, and steward donors; and (c) work with the Governance Committee to ensure that new Directors understand and accept their responsibilities in fundraising and development.

Some things to note:

  • I encourage you to state specifically the relationship between the Development Committee and the Governance Committee, to ensure fundraising is part of the recruitment, training, and board evaluation process.
  • I also encourage you to state specifically the relationship between the Development Committee and the Finance Committee, so that the contributed revenue goals in your budget are well thought out, well supported numbers informed by the needs of the organization and the donor resources available.
  • Remember that solicitation is only one relatively small part of the donor cycle. Encouraging and empowering board members to cultivate and steward donors can increase board involvement in fundraising and open the door to more good opportunities for staff to solicit.

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Competitions and Contests — Legal and Practical Considerations

Competitions, contests, drawing, raffles, auctions — all are frequently used tools in a nonprofit organization’s fundraising arsenal. What we may forget, though, is that both the IRS and state governments have laws and regulations applicable to these types of activities, which must be considered before launch. In addition, like campaigns or other fundraising initiatives, there are practical considerations to be addressed to ensure your efforts achieve the desired results.

The benefits of competitions, contests, drawings, raffles and the like include:

  • ability to reach new markets, raise visibility, create excitement
  • tapping into a revenue source other than philanthropy
  • for competitions, the opportunity to seek new ideas or creative input to address issues related to the organization’s mission

Challenges to watch out for include:

  • need for comprehensive, explicit rules, which you cannot change midstream
  • ability to publicize to the right audience to ensure your pool of entries will achieve your desired goal
  • no ability to cancel
  • requirement that all prizes be awarded, regardless of ultimate quantity or quality of entries
  • requirement of a public benefit (i.e., fundraising for your charitable mission or the development of a response to an issue of broad consequence)
  • conflicts of interest between competition applicants and judges
  • limitations on employee and related party participation

Rules relating to contests and competitions, where winners are selected based on merit or skills based criteria, and raffles or drawings, where winners are selected based on chance, will be subject to different rules and regulations by state and local governments. Those rules and regulations can include required disclosures, as well as registration and reporting requirements.

If your organization wants to consider a contest, competition, drawing or other event of this type, be sure to allow three to four months for planning. Also be sure to include a marketing and communication strategy, as well as clear goals and objectives for your event.

McKinsey and Company authored an excellent article on competitions and philanthropic prizes, which we commend to your reading. You can find it by clicking here.

For a good analysis of the considerations behind charitable auctions, check out this article from Blue Avocado, a magazine of the Nonprofits Insurance Alliance.

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Why you need a great accountant on your nonprofit team

We’ve talked about the benefits of the advice of a savvy accountant for a for profit business, but nonprofits need a great accountant on their team, too. Why would a nonprofit need an accountant if they don’t need to pay taxes? Why, to keep you from needing to pay taxes, of course!

Nonprofits are exempt from taxes in general, but there are some exceptions. Nonprofits can also be subject to penalties from noncompliance with various IRS rules and pronouncements. Here are some things you should be thinking about:

  • Are you conducting any activities that could generate unrelated business income, which is taxable even to a nonprofit (think gift shops and snack bars, depending on the type of organization you have)
  • Are you following all the IRS rules about acknowledging contributions correctly
  • Are you accepting gifts of art work, cars, boats or other unusual property
  • Are any of the gifts you receive restricted by your donors for a specific project or purpose
  • Have you classified your employees properly as either employee or independent contractor, and can you tweak the way any staff members work to reduce your employer tax responsibility
  • Do any of the fringe benefits you offer your employees end up creating taxable income to you (yes, that actually can happen)
  • Has anyone given you an interest in a partnership as a gift
  • Are you making grants directly to individuals, or grants to individuals or entities outside the US

These are just some of the things that can cause a nonprofit to be subject to tax or penalties if not dealt with properly, and not all of them are common sense. Whether or not you’re required to produce audited financial statements, make sure you have an accountant on your team that can help you review these and other financial practices outside of the routine context of completing your 990.